3.19.2008

Italian Easter Bread


(Please note that I have moved my blog as of September, 2009. This post is now at: http://tinyurl.com/y9z5k38. Please hop on over and read this post at my new site. Thanks!)



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41 comments:

  1. I probably won't be upstairs for a while mom, but I just wanted to let you know it was amazing.

    I'm glad I got to come home now, I would hate to break my 19 year run on having this once a year.

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  2. Wow, These look amazing! So glad I found your blog! I took a visit and I'll be back for sure!

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  3. I love these breads. How fun.
    What a great tradition.

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  4. My mom make those cakes too,every Easter, every year.
    Then she present them to everyone she knows.
    Sicerly, i don't like them so much...

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  5. Anonymous1/23/2009

    This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  6. Anonymous1/23/2009

    This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  7. These look wonderful! So this recipe makes more of a sweet bread? Can you put something other than an egg in the center?

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  8. Anonymous3/26/2009

    wow !! they are very nice !! good job .. they saved my project ...

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  9. Anonymous3/26/2009

    Va bene! But no anise seed? What region of Italy is this recipe from?

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  10. mmm! these look prettier than the loaves i grew up with! i like the mini-size--sooo cute!

    QUESTION: i would like to make them for gifts. do you think they would travel unrefrigerated for a couple days or spoil?

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  11. Flappergirl: I made them once to send to my nephews and I wrapped them tightly with plastic wrap and they were great when they got there. However, tell the recipient not to eat the egg. It will probably be spoiled.

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  12. Anonymous4/02/2009

    Is there an Italian name for these breads?

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  13. Anonymous4/03/2009

    These individual Sweet Breads look Great!

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  14. can i substitute the 1/3 cup of butter with margarine

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  15. Anonymous4/05/2009

    Perfect recipe!
    My family loved it!
    Thanks!

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  16. Anonymous4/06/2009

    Thank you. This Bread was not only declious,
    but looked great with all the colors of Easter.
    Made me very happy

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  17. YUM. we will be making these!! thank you!

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  18. Anonymous4/08/2009

    Love the pictures...and love the Easter Bread (which in my family we call Casatiello).

    Happy Easter Everyone!

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  19. Anonymous4/08/2009

    Great bread. I make this every Holy Saturday with my mother and we make it in the shape of a cross. Everyone always loves it.

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  20. What a beautiful bread! I need to find time to make this before Easter.

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  21. Anonymous4/09/2009

    I made this bread today and it came out good .It looks beautiful and tastes yummy !!!.Thanks for the recipe .

    Bini

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  22. Anonymous4/10/2009

    In italian these are called "Pupa con l'uova" at least in Sicily.

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  23. i love these. my local guy makes them and the egg is not cooked through so when you peel them you can dip the sweet bread into the yoke. it is the perfect breakfast.

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  24. Anonymous4/11/2009

    Che cose?

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  25. italian diva567: I think you could substitute margarine, but why would you? Butter tastes better and is healthier than margarine.

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  26. we made this tonight - it is so yummy! thanks!

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  27. Anonymous4/11/2009

    Calabrians call it Sguta. I called it "ah shoota" which the spelling is incorrect but the transaltion means dry.LOL. Grew up with it, always a tradtion.But never had the recipe.Thankyou I will try it and see if it tastes the same.Will have to ask an older relative if they use anise.

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  28. CHRIS from Milford, PA4/11/2009

    BAKING IS MY PASSION! JUST TOOK THEM OUT OF THE OVEN AND THEY CAME OUT GREAT. CAN'T WAIT TO EAT THEM TOMORROW. HAPPY EASTER EVERYONE

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  29. CEF: I wonder how he makes them so that they yolks are not cooked all the way through??
    Anonymous: "Che cose?" Really?
    Jesse and Chris : So glad you made them.

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  30. Hello-
    Just wanted to comment that I made these yesterday for Easter and they were superb. They tasted so similar to the Easter bread my grandmother used to make, which was exactly what I was hoping for!

    Only change I made was using instant yeast instead of rapid rise, and a tad less sugar. Also, I refrigerated the shaped rolls after their first rise, and then took them out to finish rising in the morning (this took about 1 1/2 hours--I went back to bed!).

    We had them for breakfast, spread with butter and nutella. So delicious! Thank you!

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  31. Amanda: So glad you made them and liked them. I will have to remember the Nutella addition! That sounds great.

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  32. Anonymous4/13/2009

    Just what I was looking for, they look just like the breads my mom used to make. Can't wait to try the recipe. Buon Pasqua!

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  33. Dolores4/20/2009

    I baked these for Easter and just baked them again. My family loves them.

    Great recipe.

    Thank you for sharing it

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  34. I found you looking for an Italian Easter bread recipe. And what a gorgeous one this is! Your blog is just lovely.

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  35. Anonymous6/27/2009

    Thank you for posting the recipe. My mom and dad were from Calabrian and every Holy Thursday my mother was start the recipe and wake up early on Good Friday to bake them. Where my mom came from she called them "cosuppa".

    Can't wait to try your recipe out, they look amazing.

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  36. Anonymous3/15/2010

    My folks were from sounthern Italy "San Johna"(spell incorrect) We call it sounds like (mooch a lota). Additon - We Used black anise seeds aquired from Italy. all the old folks are gone , I haven't been able to find the Black anise seed and had to substitute anise seed from grocery stores.

    great site - thanks

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  37. Anonymous3/15/2010

    I have made this one from Betty Crocker cook book for over forty five years. Rub a little cooking oil on the raw eggs and they are shinny and do not crack open. I sometimes color the eggs separatelly and also cook them and add after the bread comes out of the oven, I use white regular eggs for the bread and then, we all have an egg to eat as my kids wanted to save the colored eggs for later!!!!!!!!
    You can also make this bread in a tube pan and no braiding of the dough. Let the dough rise to almost the top of the tube pan( Angel Food Cake Pan) or bundt pan. You can make a long loaf like the shape of real Italian bread too.
    Sue

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  38. Anonymous4/04/2010

    I made them last night for Easter. I made mine without the egg. I had to try one. It was GREAT

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  39. Anonymous4/23/2011

    My grandmother's family came from providence of Fondi,Italy. She made the bread dough with a few drops of anise oil for flavoring. I had to use alot more than the 3.5 cups of flour recomended.

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